Broncos expert says team doesn’t need Tony Romo

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Aug 19, 2016; Arlington, TX, USA; Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo (9) during the game against the Miami Dolphins at AT&T Stadium. The Cowboys defeat the Dolphins 41-14. Mandatory Credit: Jerome Miron-USA TODAY Sports

The Denver Broncos missed the playoffs in 2016 after winning Super Bowl 50 – and the offense was the main reason for that. Trevor Siemian was inconsistent, the offensive line was awful and the ground game and receivers were lackluster at best.


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The team has since been linked to Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo, who is surely going to be traded or released in the offseason. If the Broncos picked up Romo, their bulk of problems on offense would be taken care of.

But should they go after him? Mike Klis from 9news was asked this in his mailbag, but he isn’t on board for the Romo Train:

“Tony Romo is not pragmatic. Not when you have a first-round quarterback in Paxton Lynch who needs to get on the field in 2017. Not when Romo is about to turn 37 and has started only four games in the past two seasons because of injuries. Not when Trevor Siemian just had a fine NFL playing debut in 2016.”

Klis also said that Trevor Siemian played just fine in 2016, dealing with injuries and could succeed if he gets more protection up front.

Another fan asked about the possibility of trading Trevor Siemian for Jay Cutler, but Klis was quick to shoot that down. Let’s be honest, that trade has absolutely zero chance of happening at this point.

At this point, the chances of Romo becoming a Bronco remain a long shot. There are no indications that John Elway is interested. It also is rather risky to pick up a 37-year-old who’s played four games over the past two seasons.

 

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