House Money: The Raiders Using a Late Round Pick on Sidney Jones

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Sidney Jones
Nov 27, 2015; Seattle, WA, USA; Washington Huskies defensive back Sidney Jones (26) breaks up a pass intended for Washington State Cougars wide receiver Gabe Marks (9) during the third quarter at Husky Stadium. The Huskies won 45-10. Mandatory Credit: Jennifer Buchanan-USA TODAY Sports

The perils of the draft process struck Washington’s Sidney Jones hard last weekend when he suffered a torn Achilles tendon. The devastating injury occurred during the Huskies’ pro day with several scouts in attendance. With that said, the Raiders should still look into the Washington CB.

The pro day was one of a myriad of events prospects go through in front of NFL scouts. But, in a blink of an eye, expectations changed. Projected as a top 15 pick and considered arguably the best cornerback in the draft, Jones’ injury dashes those dreams. For this reason, he will fall deep into the draft. The average timetable for recovering from a torn Achilles among NFL players is 11 months.


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One of the 32 teams will surely take a flier on Jones and essentially redshirt him on IR in year one. While he won’t be available in 2017, Jones will still generate plenty of interest. The Oakland Raiders should roll the dice if he’s available in the third round and beyond. Similarly, Jones’ pre-NFL career remind should remind some of former Bills RB Willis McGahee. During his last college game, McGahee tore the ACL, PCL, and MCL . Yet, Buffalo selected him 23 overall. After sitting out his rookie season, McGahee finished with 8,474 yards and 65/ Sp, the precedence exists for a later round attempt.

While an Achilles injury will surely sap him of some of his speed (4.47 40) and leaping ability (33.5 vertical), Jones’ talents are undeniable. The 6-foot, 186-pound corner is physical, has a nose for the ball and is ultra competitive.  Jones is often compared to a former Husky and current Kansas City Chiefs corner, one that has been a thorn in the Raiders’ side.

“I think he picked up all of (Marcus) Peters’ good traits as a player without the personality defects. He marries that great FBI (football intelligence) with an explosive close-out and that will win in the pros just like it wins in college,” an NFC East regional opined of Jones.

 

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