All cover32 Four-Round Mock NFL Draft

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Sep 19, 2015; College Station, TX, USA; Texas A&M Aggies defensive lineman Myles Garrett (15) sacks Nevada Wolf Pack quarterback Tyler Stewart (15) during the first quarter at Kyle Field. Mandatory Credit: Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports
Sep 19, 2015; College Station, TX, USA; Texas A&M Aggies defensive lineman Myles Garrett (15) sacks Nevada Wolf Pack quarterback Tyler Stewart (15) during the first quarter at Kyle Field. Mandatory Credit: Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports

With 32 teams in the NFL, trying to stay on top of all the latest news, rumors and information, is an enormous undertaking. To meet the demands of this extraordinary challenge, cover32 has a collection of more than 23 editors and a myriad of writers following each team from around the league, producing credible, authentic and high-quality content on a continual basis.

Given this distinct organizational structure, with a staff of editors and writers dedicated to covering each of the NFL’s 32 teams, cover32 has been provided a unique opportunity to create one of the most definitive mock drafts possible. When constructing this mock, the goal was to generate an accurate representation reflective of the upcoming NFL Draft in April.

Regardless of preparation, there is no such thing as a perfect mock draft. Even the most successful mocks are not without their discrepancies and miscalculations. Much like the actual NFL draft, unforeseen maneuvers and strategies come into play. It is impossible to predict the future motives and intentions of any team with complete accuracy.

In order to achieve an approximate facsimile of the draft, considerable attention was given to the draft order, team needs, best fit, current player projections and evaluations, combine results and pro-day workouts. It was our endeavor to deliver a mock draft that attempted to genuinely replicate the NFL Draft in a way that would deliver the closest potential results.


AROUND COVER32

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This Week in NFL History: Reliving the greatest moments in NFL history from April 2nd – April 8th

2017 NFL Draft: Taking a look at Stanford RB prospect Christian McCaffrey

NFL Rankings: Ranking the depth at each position in the upcoming NFL draft

What’s Trending: Tony Gonzalez leaving NFL Today

NFL Relocation: Three NFL teams relocation means big money for NFL owners


Round One

1. Cleveland Browns:  DE, Myles Garrett – Texas A&M

There’s just so many holes to fill on this Browns’ roster that it gives them a lot of freedom in the draft to go after talent rather than specific needs (because let’s face it, they need everything). The Browns need improvement all over their defense and a talented pass rusher could do wonders for their defensive performance moving forward.

2. San Francisco 49ers:  DE, Solomon Thomas – Stanford

The 49ers’ free agency moves have decreased the pressure to select a quarterback or wide receiver with their high pick, leaving specific needs for an edge rusher, along with adding depth at the offensive line, quarterback and linebacker positions. At the combine Thomas silenced concerns about his size and showed that he has the potential to be one of the most explosive edge rushers in the draft. Thomas comes with extreme versatility for a 4-3 scheme which will be implemented by the 49ers’ defense in 2017 and wouldn’t even need to move if he joins this NFL team.

3. Chicago Bears:  S, Jamal Adams – LSU

The Bears have been active in free agency, but haven’t found a long-term solution at any position yet this offseason. A quarterback is a possibility here, but it would be hard to pass on a player who many believe to be the best safety to enter the draft since Eric Berry. Adams is a physical, instinctive safety who can dish out hits just as well as he can drop back in coverage. He’s a natural leader who would step in from Day 1 and make an impact for the Bears on the field and off of it.

4. Jacksonville Jaguars:  RB, Leonard Fournette – LSU
Jacksonville will likely look to target a safety with the fourth overall pick, but if Jamal Adams is off the board, there is a good chance Fournette lands with the Jaguars. A commitment to the run game is not something this organization has targeted in recent years, but Fournette would give the team a true feature back that has been described as a workhorse with a rare blend of power and athleticism. With an already vastly improved defense, Fournette would give this young offense another playmaker with the ability to take some of the pressure off of Blake Bortles.
5. Tennessee Titans:  DE, Jonathan Allen – Alabama
For the second year in a row, the Titans select a top-five ranked defensive end. Allen is a 4-3 defensive tackle or a 3-4 end. He is a potential star and could be a significant upgrade over DaQuan Jones, who has been average for the Titans at defensive end. Tennessee could look to add a bookend here to play opposite Jurrell Casey. Brian Orakpo and Derrick Morgan are an excellent outside linebacker duo and the addition of Allen would about complete the set here. Opposing offenses could have their hands full attempting to keep the Titans’ edge rushers in check.
6. New York Jets:  S, Malik Hooker – Ohio State
The temptation to select a quarterback here could be very high for the Jets, but instead Gang Green could opt to add a defensive playmaker to their secondary. Hooker’s ability to read everything from an opposing quarterback’s eyes to receivers entering his vicinity, make him a real threat to throw against, on each and every down. While his strength is against the pass as, time and experience could make him just as effective against the run. In 2016, defensively the Jets’ primary struggle was against deep balls, that would no longer be an issue with Hooker lurking in their defensive backfield.
7. Los Angeles Chargers:  CB, Marshon Lattimore – Ohio State

Despite having two talented players currently manning the cornerback position, the Chargers are in need of additional depth across nearly their entire roster. A potential playoff contender that was ultimately ravaged by injuries last season, Los Angeles is in the unique position to take the best player available, while hoping everyone remains healthy in 2017. At this point, that individual looks to be Lattimore. He may be inexperienced but has all the tools necessary to be an annual Pro Bowl caliber player.

8. Carolina Panthers:  DE, Derek Barnett – Tennessee
The Panthers were one of the league’s biggest disappointments last year; plagued by mistakes on both sides of the ball. One of the major differences between the 2015 and 2016 seasons, was the inability to put pressure on the opposing quarterbacks. The signing of Julius Peppers during the offseason is at best a short term solution. Barnett has an impressive collegiate resume and could be someone the Panthers see as having the ability to make an immediate impact.
9. Cincinnati Bengals:  LB, Reuben Foster – Alabama

Adding Foster opposite of linebacker, Vontaze Burfict, has the potential to make a tremendous impact. Foster is a vicious hitter whose playmaking capabilities could benefit the Bengals, especially in nickel packages. The Alabama product has the ability to cover in the passing game, stop opposing rushing attacks, or get to the quarterback if called upon. His addition could immediately give Cincinnati one of the top-linebacking groups in all the NFL.

10. Buffalo Bills:  WR, Corey Davis – Western Michigan
In desperate need of someone to play opposite of wideout, Sammy Watkins, the Bills could opt to select the big man it needs at its’ number two wide receiver position. By taking Davis, the Bills would get a big, physical presence with a history of success all over the field. Given Watkins ability to run the deep route, Davis could be the perfect complementary option in the Bills’ passing attack.
11. New Orleans Saints:  WR, John Ross – Washington
Ross has big play potential with an ability to stretch opposing defenses. He was Jake Browning’s go to guy near the goal line, while scoring seventeen touchdowns in his final season for the Huskies. Ross could help fill the void left by Brandin Cooks’ departure to New England and provide Drew Brees and Saints’ potent offense with another vertical threat.
12. Cleveland Browns:  WR, Mike Williams – Clemson
With the loss of Terrelle Pryor Cleveland is in need a big playmaker in the receiving corps. An aging Kenny Britt is not going to be the spark that ignites the Browns’ offense. With Corey Coleman being the speed guy on one side, Williams’ 6’4″ 218-pound size, could give the Browns some much needed bulk at the receiving position.
13. Arizona Cardinals:  QB, Deshaun Watson – Clemson
The Cardinals have grown old at two of the most critical positions on offense, as both wideout, Larry Fitzgerald and quarterback, Carson Palmer, have gotten another year older. Let’s be honest, a battalion of Fitzgerald’s at the wide receiver position does not help Arizona if they don’t have someone who can pull the trigger to get them the football. Palmer has gotten brittle with age and that’s not on him; just genetics. Selecting Watson would be a wise move for Arizona with Palmer as the incumbent, allowing Watson to learn. It’s a rare opportunity that the Cardinals should not miss out on.
14. Philadelphia Eagles:  CB, Marlon Humphrey – Alabama
After parting ways with both starting cornerbacks from last season, the Eagles need to find at least one starting corner in the draft. While this pick very likely would have been Sidney Jones before his disastrous achilles injury, Humphrey makes for a decent plan-B.
15. Indianapolis Colts:  DE/OLB, Takkarist McKinley – UCLA
The Colts are desperately in need of talented edge rushers. With Erik Walden (free agent) and Robert Mathis (retired) out of the mix, McKinley has the ability to contribute right away. He finished second in the PAC-12 last season with 18 tackles for loss and 10 sacks. Though McKinley’s size, 6’2″ 240 pounds, might force him to be just a third down specialist early on, he has the talent to be an every-down contributor on the edge.
16. Baltimore Ravens:  WR, Ryan Switzer – North Carolina
There are few sure things in life. But, after seeing every one of his college games, scouring his Senior Bowl workouts, examining his Combine performances, talking to him and his father at length, and observing his Pro Day performance, there is no doubt that he is the explosive inside player that the Ravens need to compliment the speed burners on the outside. Switzer will likely face single coverage and use his surprising strength and lethal speed to destroy teams underneath. He is the type of blue-collared, smart, character guy that the Ravens are built on. Switzer looks to be a sure thing and is worth a first-round flier when considering the other targets selected. Switzer is likely to be the next successful-shifty-clutch guy. The world will question us now, just like they questioned Seattle when they took Russell Wilson, but soon they will regard this as a very smart pick as well. Watch the RACs!
17. Washington Redskins:  WR, JuJu Smith-Schuster – USC
The Redskins have become a bona fide dumpster fire this season since free agency began; losing their two best wide receivers, Pierre Garcon and DeSean Jackson, and general manager, Scot McCLoughan. As much as they should be considering defense with this pick, the glaring holes (plural) at wide receiver may be of an even bigger concern. At 6’1” 215 pounds, JSmith-Schuster was a 12-game starter in 2016, catching 54 passes for 724 yards and five touchdowns. He could be yet another young wideout to pair with last year’s selection, Josh Doctson of TCU, giving Kirk Cousins two big targets on the outsides. This might not be the safest pick for Washington, given its defensive woes last season, but it is the best one given the losses on the offensive side of the football, where replacing two veterans with youth might prove dividends down the road.
18. Tennessee Titans:  LB/DB, Jabrill Peppers – Michigan
Peppers participated as a linebacker and a safety at the NFL Combine. This hybrid type could be perfect for Dick Lebeau’s Troy Polamalu-Rod Woodson-Carnell Lake-role, but may be asking an awful lot out of a rookie. Hopefully, Peppers will be up to the challenge. He has the athleticism and style of play to get it done. The Titans were a top-10 pass defense in 2015 and a top-five run defense in 2016. Peppers could be “the missing piece” for Lebeau to create a top-overall defense in Tennessee.
19. Tampa Bay Buccaneers:  TE, OJ Howard – Alabama

The Buccaneers arguably have one of the best tight ends in the NFL in Cameron Brate. He led the league in touchdowns in 2017 with eight, however, he is a below average blocker. Howard has the ability to immediately step in and bolster the pass protection and could be lethal in two-tight end sets. Considered by many the best tight end in the draft and a day-one contributor, the Buccaneers could select this dynamic player that would immediately vault their offense into a deadly attack, featuring multiple weapons. Head coach, Dirk Koetter, is known to feed his tight ends and Howard could be a prime target for one of the NFL’s best young quarterbacks in Jameis Winston.

20. Denver Broncos:  RB, Christian McCaffrey – Stanford
Connecting the dots could be very easy with this pick. John Elway’s ties to Stanford and Ed McCaffrey make this a logical marriage. It does not hurt that Denver could use an upgrade and addition at the running back position as well. There are questions abound for CJ Anderson’s availability and Devontae Booker’s ability heading into 2017. McCaffrey’s Swiss Army Knife skill set could inject some life into what was a stale Broncos’ offense in 2016.
21. Detroit Lions:  LB, Haason Reddick – Temple
Detroit needs starting linebackers in the worst way; particularly with the release of DeAndre Levy. Reddick has been considered a workout warrior, but his production — 22.5 tackles for loss and 10.5 sacks in 2016 — speaks for itself. Quick and explosive in coverage, the Temple standout could provide the Lions with a dynamic playmaker who can start anywhere in a desperate linebacking corps.
22. Miami Dolphins:  OLB, T.J. Watt – Wisconsin
The Miami Dolphins need one more starting linebacker and could benefit from some added youth at the defensive end position. Banking on both his name and size and stats from his time at Wisconsin, the Miami Dolphins could look to add Watt as the future face of one of these positional groups. Depending on how he developes size wise, Watt could fill the need at either of the above mentioned needs. For the purpose of this mock draft though, we will say that he is a day-one starter at outside linebacker.
23. New York Giants:  TE, David Njoku – Miami

While the addition of Brandon Marshall should be a major help to Eli Manning and Odell Beckham Jr., the Giants still need a tight end that can actually play. Njoku’s 6’4″ 246-pound frame, is chiseled from granite. He can catch, break tackles and block at a high level already and with experience, he will only get better. Yes, the team needs to add young and cheap options along their defensive front, but this squad is built to contend in the postseason right now and adding a difference maker on offense should be the priority over financial issues in the future.

24. Oakland Raiders:  DL, Malik McDowell – Michigan State

Despite employing the league’s most versatile and explosive pass rusher in Khalil Mack, the Raiders struggled to generate a consistent pass rush. Netting just 25 sacks is inexcusable. McDowell could be the missing piece the Raiders need. The fascinating aspect of drafting McDowell would be how he fits into the scheme that new assistant head coach, John Pagano, implements. Pagano, a pupil of Wade Phillips, could utilize McDowell’s length, pursuit and swim move to effectively bolster the Raiders’ pass rush.

25. Houston Texans:  QB, DeShone Kizer – Notre Dame
With the $72 million man shipped off to Cleveland, the Texans can (again) try to find their franchise quarterback. Kizer may not be ready to contribute in week one, but with time he could develop into a top-10 quarterback in the league.
26. Seattle Seahawks:  S, Budda Baker – Washington
The Seahawks are in need of secondary help, both with depth and starters. While Baker shapes up more as a potential starter at safety, he could supply excellent depth behind Earl Thomas while filling time in the slot in nickel formations. The Seahawks are not afraid of taking local players and love playmakers and Baker undoubtedly fits the mold.
27. Kansas City Chiefs:  RB, Alvin Kamara – Tennessee
Exit Jamaal Charles, enter Alvin Kamara. Head Coach, Andy Reid, knows where his bread is buttered and the Chiefs’ offense has missed the flash that Charles once provided. Kamara’s strength is found in his burst. He gets to top speed quickly and has the moves of a return man when he hits the open field. Kamara can also lineup out wide and has the hands to be an above average receiver. Topping off his skillset is Kamara’s blocking ability. He is not a rookie that comes in as a liability when protecting the quarterback. While Spencer Ware is a nice piece to have, Kamara has the ability to be the future of the position.
28. Dallas Cowboys:  DE, Taco Charlton – Michigan
With plenty of good corners still on the board, the Cowboys have no reason to reach when they could get a top-20 player and an immediate upgrade along their defensive line in  Charlton. The Michigan standout could finally give Dallas the long-term pass rusher they have been seeking up front since DeMarcus Ware held down the fort. Rod Marinelli, a defensive line specialist, has the potential to mold Charlton into a potential star coming off of the edge.
29. Green Bay Packers:  S, Obi Melifonwu – Connecticut

Green Bay’s aging secondary was shredded for a good half of the season last year. Melifonwu could give the Packers’ defensive backfield both the young talent and depth that it sorely needs.

30. Pittsburgh Steelers:  OLB, Tim Williams – Alabama
After much deliberation, the Steelers could decide that Williams’ off the field questions are worth dealing with due to his on field production. With linebackers at a premium, due to lack of high end quality, it would be wise for the black and gold to take one in the first-round; Williams’ talent is just too much to ignore.
31. Atlanta Falcons:  DT, Nazair Jones – North Carolina
The Falcons are going to be looking to anchor their defense in this year’s draft following the devastation of their Super Bowl LI loss. Jones brings versatility to the defensive line and can play almost every position along it. The Falcons would be wise not to pass up on such an opportunity this late in the first-round.
32. New Orleans Saints:  CB, Kevin King – Washington

King was part of one the best secondaries across the nation in all of college football last season. The Saints need a lot of help defensively and could desperately use King’s cover skills to upgrade one of the most forgiving secondaries in the NFL.

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  • Brian_pdx

    Terrible draft for the Vikings, passing on Mixon then two defensive players in the 3rd when offense is the biggest need. TE isn’t a huge need and drafting one this early with other needs is also not defensible. Mixon then OL for next 2 or 2 of next three.

    • Miles Dittberner

      Given the Vikings’ needs, I think this addresses them fairly appropriately. With all the help they needed on the OL, taking two of the top OL prospects in Feeney and Elflein, you can’t ask for much more. The Vikings lost Munnerlyn and replacing him with one of the top nickel corners in Tabor was a priority as Newman is getting a bit long in the tooth. Willis is too good a prospect to pass up at DE and helps fill the void of Greenway as he can also slide in at OLB. With the Vikings losing Patterson, Johnson and Ellison in FA and Treadwell an unknown, taking a TE seemed like a logical move especially when considering they were attempting to sign Cook. This tells me they are in the market of adding another TE, especially one who can receive and give the Vikings another passing threat. Leggett is just that. Drafting Mixon when they signed Murray didn’t make a whole lot of sense, considering that Minnesota is not too high on him with his off field concerns. I did my best to address the Vikings’ roster needs in a way that lines up with what they are most likely to do given what they have done so far.

      • Brian_pdx

        We disagree and that is fine. I like Feeney and Elfein but they can still get good OL later, including Elfien. The Vikings emphasizing defense in the draft when they had one of the best defenses in the NFL while also having one of the worst offenses in the league is, frankly, hard to defend. They lost too many games due to the offense failing to perform. If Alexander isn’t ready to start at nickle call it just one more blown draft pick by the Vikings. They signed Datone Jones to beef up the DL and he can play tackle or end pushing DL down the needs list and also the TE from arena football. A long shot but they are more thin at OL and RB than any other positions. Last year made that obvious. Murray’s signing still leaves them thin at RB and Mixon is first round talent. Reports say ZImmer likes Mixon but who knows. At least 2 of the first five picks should be OL, plus Mixon if he is there. Shurmur might agree. Mocks are fun for discussion and debate and the Vikings must get a lot better at offense. If Mixon is gone taking Feeney makes sense.

        • Miles Dittberner

          I don’t understand why you think I emphasized defense when 3 of the 5 picks were spent on offensive players. To me that would be emphasizing offense. Granted the Vikings had one of the best defenses, but they also lost some key pieces which is why I chose to take the defensive players I did, in order to maintain their top defensive standing. To let it slide would be to let the Vikings’ defense slide which is indefensible when this team relies so heavily on its defense to get them through. Getting two of the top defensive picks in the draft in the 3rd or 4th round is a good move in my book.

          Two of the first five picks I used were on OL in taking Feeney and Elflein, to beef up a thin OL and one of the worst units in the NFL. Drafting two of the better OL prospects I feel accomplishes this. Improving the OL will vastly help the running game as well, making spending a top pick on a RB a little pointless. Also, getting a RB with a top pick over OL makes little sense as if there is no one to create holes and running lanes, the RB will have no where to run. Look at Peterson last year. One of the best RB’s the league has ever seen and he turned in his worst season as a pro behind one of the worst OL’s in the league. Without a strong offensive unit up front, there will be no running game, making taking OL players all that much more the top priority. If I’m taking a RB in the draft it’s going to be Brian Hill from Wyoming who has a similar skill set to Ezekiel Elliott but half the cost and none of the baggage Mixon has.

          We lost WR depth and a TE to FA. Spending the last pick in the 4th round on a great receiving TE will only help to make up for what we lost. Take a look at the tape on Leggett and then tell me he was a bad pick with the Vikings last pick in the 4th round. He would only help the Vikings passing game by adding another legitimate receiving threat. He is a great improvement over the plodding stone hands of Rudolph.

          • Brian_pdx

            The point is simply you can’t pass up a first round talent like Mixon for an OL at 48. If Mixon is gone fine. I really don’t think Peterson was good last year and using him as an example doesn’t hold water. *&*&*& has 3 fumbles in 5 playoff games. He is done and should have been traded two years ago. The OL as you say did suck but injuries were crazy. The WRs haven’t been good for years. If Hill is Elliott I will pay for his move to Minnesota. Seriously. Saw another draft where the guy went safety, TE then DL for Minny. People have different ideas. Mixon is the guy at 48. He will tear it up for years. The OL next.

          • Miles Dittberner

            I beg to differ. Mixon is far from a guarantee and it makes little sense for the Vikings to invest the 48th overall pick on a RB after signing Murray. Mixon and Murray cannot carry the ball at the same time. So, why invest so heavily in the RB position when there is an obvious need on the OL to run block and pass protect. Again, where is Mixon going to go if there is nowhere to run? The smart move is to go OL and get a top talent like Feeney who is not going to be available in the later rounds.

            Also after the whole Peterson domestic violence debacle, I doubt the Vikings are itching to bring in a guy with similar baggage. I get it, you like Mixon and want to see him in a Vikings’ uniform, but that does not necessarily make it the right pick. It lacks objectivity and shows clear bias when there are greater needs to be addressed. If taking a RB is the right move at 48, you would have provided alternatives to Mixon. Looking at it objectively, one realizes that taking a top OL talent is much more important than drafting another RB.

            I beg to differ about Minnesota’s WR’s. Last season both Diggs and Thielen were less than 100 yards shy of reaching 1,000 receiving yards. I’m not sure what your definition of good is, but I think that is pretty damn good, especially when you factor in the Vikings’ lack of pass protection and dreadful rushing attack. Considering that, the fact that either of them nearly crossed the 1,000 yard threshold is pretty amazing.

            Adding Leggett only serves to improve the passing attack, which you have said hasn’t been good for years. Leggett provides Bradford with a solid intermediate threat that has tremendous hands and a phenomenal catch radius. He’s big and athletic and gives the Vikings much needed depth in the passing game as he can be deployed as a hybrid TE-WR. Leggett gives the Vikings the big receiving target they have been lacking. Again check the tape on him and tell me he wouldn’t be an improvement to our passing attack.

            Brian Hill, is the way to go at RB in my opinion. If the Vikings’ are going to draft a RB, getting Hill is a much better value than Mixon for not nearly the same cost and without the off-field distractions. Hill has amazing talent and provides a similar skill set to Elliott. Check the tape on Hill. He’s dynamic with both speed and power. He has the ability to make defenders miss but is willing to initiate contact and go right through them at the same time. This is a guy who “will tear it up for years.”

            I have done my homework, have you done yours? There is greater opportunity than just Mixon in this draft.

          • Miles Dittberner

            I beg to differ. Mixon is far from a guarantee and it makes little sense for the Vikings to invest the 48th overall pick on a RB after signing Murray. Mixon and Murray cannot carry the ball at the same time. So, why invest so heavily in the RB position when there is an obvious need on the OL to run block and pass protect. Again, where is Mixon going to go if there is nowhere to run? The smart move is to go OL and get a top talent like Feeney who is not going to be available in the later rounds.

            Also after the whole Peterson domestic violence debacle, I doubt the Vikings are itching to bring in a guy with similar baggage. I get it, you like Mixon and want to see him in a Vikings’ uniform, but that does not necessarily make it the right pick. It lacks objectivity and shows clear bias when there are greater needs to be addressed. If taking a RB is the right move at 48, you would have provided alternatives to Mixon. Looking at it objectively, one realizes that taking a top OL talent is much more important than drafting another RB.

            I beg to differ about Minnesota’s WR’s. Last season both Diggs and Thielen were less than 100 yards shy of reaching 1,000 receiving yards. I’m not sure what your definition of good is, but I think that is pretty damn good, especially when you factor in the Vikings’ lack of pass protection and dreadful rushing attack. Considering that, the fact that either of them nearly crossed the 1,000 yard threshold is pretty amazing.

            Adding Leggett only serves to improve the passing attack, which you have said hasn’t been good for years. Leggett provides Bradford with a solid intermediate threat that has tremendous hands and a phenomenal catch radius. He’s big and athletic and gives the Vikings much needed depth in the passing game as he can be deployed as a hybrid TE-WR. Leggett gives the Vikings the big receiving target they have been lacking. Again check the tape on him and tell me he wouldn’t be an improvement to our passing attack.

            Brian Hill, is the way to go at RB in my opinion. If the Vikings’ are going to draft a RB, getting Hill is a much better value than Mixon for not nearly the same cost and without the off-field distractions. Hill has amazing talent and provides a similar skill set to Elliott. Check the tape on Hill. He’s dynamic with both speed and power. He has the ability to make defenders miss but is willing to initiate contact and go right through them at the same time. This is a guy who “will tear it up for years.”

            I have done my homework, have you done yours? There is greater opportunity than just Mixon in this draft.

          • Brian_pdx

            I thrive on condescension so thank you. The Vikings are a business and you don’t draft (hire) someone based on what someone else did on the staff previously. Have you ever managed a small or large organization? Staffed or managed people? The Vikings offense, by any measure, sucked last year. Sucked is a technical classification I learned in my MBA program. Also you seem unable to grasp I agree Feeney is a talent but Mixon will be there at 48 and Feeney might not be. We have an excellent TE and competition on the roster for that position so drafting one so early is a waste. Mixon at 48 is the ticket, if Feeney is there it is a harder choice but with the other OL options later not that hard. In other words, the drop off on RB is hard and OL, especially C/G not so hard. Homework? I have experience.

          • Miles Dittberner

            You also don’t hire (draft) someone that brings similar problems to the staff. So based off what someone else did previously, may influence your decision to hire or not hire someone. In this case, Mixon brings similar baggage that Peterson brought to the team and creates an unnecessary distraction that the team doesn’t need. Not to mention, he is not the best fit for a team that just went out and brought in someone to be the feature RB. Again, both Murray and Mixon cannot run with the ball at the same time. Again, neither will have room to run if there is not adequate protection up front. Regardless if Mixon is there at 48 or not, he is not the guy that best addresses the Vikings’ roster needs. If RB was the way to go at 48, you would be providing alternative RB’s for the Vikings’ to draft at this position. Spending their top pick in the draft on a RB when their biggest need at OL is downright foolish. You are not going to get the same OL talent later in the draft. Maybe the potential but not the same kind of talent that has the ability to make an immediate impact and contribution to the team. Even if they draft Mixon at 48, he is still going to split time with Murray, whereas an OL at 48 will be an every down contributor and thus has much greater value to the team. Mixon is not going to suddenly turn the team around single handedly. The biggest reason the Vikings’ offense “sucked” last year has everything to do with the OL and not nearly so much the talent or lack thereof at RB, so fixing the OL is the greatest ticket to turning around an offense that sucked last year, again meaning that OL is the way to go. Spending the top pick on a more valuable OL will do much more for the offense than drafting a RB with baggage and off-field distraction issues.

            Think what you want, but just because you have a hardon for Mixon does not mean he the best pick for the Vikings. I would much rather have a guy like Brian Hill who is just as talented, with none of the baggage and costs half as much as Mixon. He is going to work much harder and give the team greater effort than a guy who is going to spend half his time answering for his off the field issues.

            Further, the Vikings have little to no competition at TE. Rudolph is by far the TE1 with no one challenging him. The only competition comes in deciding when who will best blocking TE. Spending the team’s second 4th round pick, a pick that is in the bottom half of the draft mind you, on a talented pass catching TE that can upgrade the team’s passing attack, is not wasting an early pick. Again adding a playmaker to the passing game seems like a key move to help improve an offense that you said “sucked” last year.

            I have provided numerous and alternative ways for the team to improve through the draft and you remain a broken record as to how to make the team better “Mixon, Mixon, Mixon….” One player is not the end all answer to the Vikings’ problems. Mixon cannot block, pass, run and catch the ball all at the same time.

            You clearly have not done your homework and your experience amounts to three highlight videos you have watched on Mixon. Hardly any proof to your pudding, bud.

  • NarDanglers

    Vikings probably had the best draft definitely considering that they didn’t have a first round pick, they filled almost every position needed. The steelers had a pretty decent draft as well. But Baltimore by far had the worst draft not only on this site but on every site I’ve seen. Who takes nobody’s with their first 4 picks… Awful.

  • Michael Roland

    Thanks. Be more specific though…I was drafting for the Jets, KC & Denver