Counting Down The 25 Greatest Colts of All Time: 25-21

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Jan 4, 2014; Indianapolis, IN, USA; Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith (11) looks to get away from Indianapolis Colts strong safety Antoine Bethea (41) during the first quarter of the 2013 AFC wild card playoff football game at Lucas Oil Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Andrew Weber-USA TODAY Sports
Jan 4, 2014; Indianapolis, IN, USA; Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Alex Smith (11) looks to get away from Indianapolis Colts strong safety Antoine Bethea (41) during the first quarter of the 2013 AFC wild card playoff football game at Lucas Oil Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Andrew Weber-USA TODAY Sports

With the lack of football news at this point in the offseason, I thought I would count down the greatest Colts players of all time. This will include Baltimore and Indianapolis Colts. The years represent the player’s tenure as a Colt.

Enjoy the list!


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25. Mike Curtis, FB/LB, 1965-1975

The man who was best known for tackling a fan in 1971, Mike Curtis was a very solid player for the Baltimore Colts. Curtis intercepted a pass at the end of Super Bowl V to secure the win for the Colts. He had a reputation as an elite enforcer; striking fear into the hearts of opposing defense. Curtis made the all pro first team for two straight years for the Colts, in 1968 and 1969.

24. Antoine Bethea, S, 2006-2013

Bethea’s prime was overshadowed by the careers of safeties such as Ed Reed and Troy Polamalu, but he was absolutely no slouch for the Colts. He is a rough, physical safety who’s grit wills him to victory. He was one of the leaders of the defense during the days of Peyton Manning. His 2009 Pro Bowl campaign displayed his versatility, as he made 70 tackles, defended five passes, and recorded four interceptions. Bethea and Bob Sanders created a lethal safety duo for the Colts.

23. Bert Jones, QB, 1973-1981

Colts fan or not, have you ever heard of Bert Jones? Be honest. The answer is probably no, and that is truly a shame. The 1976 NFL MVP and offensive player of the year is usually forgotten among the great Colt signal callers: Peyton Manning, Johnny Unitas, Andrew Luck, and even Earl Morrall. In 1976, Jones recorded 3,104 yards, 24 touchdowns and only nine interceptions, posting a QBR of 102.5. Jones is a forgotten Colts legend, and one of Bill Belichick’s best quarterbacks of all time.

22. Adam Vinatieri, K, 2006-present

The 44 year old legend has been kicking for what feels like an eternity. Although he is best known for his clutch Super Bowl winning kicks in New England, he was just as productive in Indianapolis. In 2014, Vinatieri recorded a staggering 96.8% field goal success rate, earning him a first team all pro bid. He ranks third all time in points, with 2,378. When Vinatieri eventually decides to hang it up, he will go down as the greatest kicker of all time.

21. Chris Hinton, T/G, 1983-1989

Although the Colts missed out on John Elway to acquire Hinton, he was a very solid player for the Colts. He made the pro bowl in six of his seven seasons in Indy, and even made the all pro team in 1993 for the Falcons. Hinton was one of the best players on the 1908s Colts teams.

Who is too high or too low on this list? Continue the discussion @doctortruthboi and @cover32_IND on Twitter.

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  • Eric East

    We never should have let Bethea go, or Garcon for that matter either.
    Bethea wasn’t just versatile, able to play FS or SS…. he was the epitomy of consistency.
    The man ever rarely got burned, rarely ever missed a tackle, always seemed to be where he needed to be, and he rarely missed game due to injury. Letting him walk in 2014 and keeping Laron Landry was about as big a mistake as trading a 1st round draft pick for Trent Richardson or that 1st round pick on Bjoern Werner.